La Fable d'OxA-21965

Anna Eyler | Nicolas Lapointe |

July 3 to August 30, 2019
​​Residence Bòlit (Girona, Catalonia)



Since the Industrial Revolution, our relationship with the earth has become increasingly mediated by technologies of visualisation, sonification, classification, mapping, and simulation. At the same time, it is the minerals and materials of the earth that have facilitated these technological developments. The earth may therefore be understood as a communicative object itself, providing the minerals essential for contemporary digital technologies. But is this all that the earth says? Are there other stories buried beneath the surface?

During their residency, Eyler and Lapointe are exploring the intimate connections between geology and technology. Human beings and the earth exist in a form of feedback loop, influencing---and in turn being influenced by---one another. Within a contemporary context, however, the overwhelming build-up of electronic waste exposes the geophysical stakes of this relationship. The artists consider our engagement with technology within the context of deep (or geological) time as a way of challenging the idea of technological development as “natural progress.” They are currently completing a a single-channel video that features 3D scanned geological and archaeological phenomena from the Girona region of Catalonia.

Since the Industrial Revolution, our relationship with the earth has become increasingly mediated by technologies of visualisation, sonification, classification, mapping, and simulation. At the same time, it is the minerals and materials of the earth that have facilitated these technological developments. The earth may therefore be understood as a communicative object itself, providing the minerals essential for contemporary digital technologies. But is this all that the earth says? Are there other stories buried beneath the surface?



During their residency, Eyler and Lapointe are exploring the intimate connections between geology and technology. Human beings and the earth exist in a form of feedback loop, influencing---and in turn being influenced by---one another. Within a contemporary context, however, the overwhelming build-up of electronic waste exposes the geophysical stakes of this relationship. The artists consider our engagement with technology within the context of deep (or geological) time as a way of challenging the idea of technological development as “natural progress.” They are currently completing a a single-channel video that features 3D scanned geological and archaeological phenomena from the Girona region of Catalonia.








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